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H.R.40 / S.1083 - Commission to Study and Develop Reparation Proposals for African-Americans Act

Congress man and Senator Cory Booker talking at a Congressional event in front of the American flag.

To address the fundamental injustice, cruelty, brutality, and inhumanity of slavery in the United States and the 13 American colonies between 1619 and 1865 and to establish a commission to study and consider a national apology and proposal for reparations for the institution of slavery, its subsequent de jure and de facto racial and economic discrimination against African-Americans, and impact of these forces on living African-Americans, to make recommendations to the Congress on appropriate remedies, and for other purposes.



You might favor this bill if:
►  You believe that the fundamental injustice, cruelty, brutality, and inhumanity of slavery should be addressed not only with a national apology to those affected by slavery, but by studying the social effects of slavery, segregation and its continuing economic implications. Slavery is a blemish on the nation’s history and until it is formally addressed, the country’s history will remain marked by this blight.

You might oppose this bill if:
►  You believe that slavery does not contribute to the racial and economic discrimination against African-Americans. The fundamental injustice, cruelty, brutality, and inhumanity of slavery in the United States and the 13 American colonies between 1619 and 1865 was a thing of the past and there’s, therefore, no reason for a national apology.
Introduced House Senate President Law


The Commission to Study and Develop Reparation Proposals for African-Americans Act aims to address the fundamental injustice, cruelty, brutality, and inhumanity of slavery in the United States and its effect on African-Americans currently living in the country while providing a national apology to those affected by slavery.

The slavery that flourished in the United States constituted an immoral and inhumane deprivation of African’s life, their liberty, and cultural heritage. Approximately 4,000,000 Africans and their descendants were enslaved in the United States and colonies.

The institution of slavery was constitutionally and statutorily sanctioned by the Government of the United States from 1789 through 1865. The legislation aims to make amends for the institution of slavery.

Following the abolition of slavery, the United States Government, at the Federal, State, and local level, continued to perpetuate, condone and often profit from practices that continued to brutalize and disadvantage African-Americans, including; unequal education, convict leasing and disproportionate treatment at the hands of the criminal justice systems.

“As a result of the historic and continued discrimination, African-Americans continue to suffer debilitating economic, educational, and health hardships including but not limited to having nearly 1,000,000 black people incarcerated, an unemployment rate more than twice the current white unemployment rate,” states the legislation.


The bill requires that the corpus of evidentiary documentation of the institution of slavery be identified, synthesized and compiled. The documentation will include:

● The capture and procurement of Africans;
● The transport of Africans to the United States and their treatment during the transport;
● The sale and acquisition of Africans as chattel property in interstate and intrastate commerce;
● The treatment of African Slaves in the colonies and the United States, including the deprivation of their freedom, exploitation of their labor, and destruction of their culture, language, religion, and families; and
● The extensive denial of humanity, and sexual abuse of persons.

The Federal and State governments of the U.S. played a vital role by supporting the institution of slavery in constitutional and statutory provisions, by preventing, opposing and restricting the efforts of formerly enslaved Africans and their descendants to repatriate to their homeland.

To ensure a proper study is carried out, a Commission will be created, comprising of 13 members.

Three members will be appointed by the President, 3 members will also be appointed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives, 1 member will be appointed by the President pro tempore of the Senate and the last 6 members will be selected from the major civil society and reparations organizations.

The Commission will have the power to hold hearings and sessions. They will also have the power to acquire official data directly from the head of any department or agency. All departments, agencies, and other instrumentalities of the executive branch of the government will have to cooperate with the Commission.

H.R.40

Sponsored by: Rep. Jackson Lee, Sheila [D-TX-18].

Cosponsored by: 0 Rep / 55 Dem.

See list of cosponsors.



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